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SOME/ART : 'CRUCIFIXION' BY FABIEN CLAUDE

I carried Fabien Claude’s his words, his piece and my interpretation. My flow of thoughts out if his. His thoughts mingling with mine. Forming new ideas and perspectives, but also forming the following way of reflecting on his piece. Open for any interpretation, like an extend of his piece.

crucifixion by fabien claude

crucifixion by fabien claude

The decay of painting

All decay holds a form of beauty that at one point loses itself. It touches every other truth in the world and at the same point becomes a lie. The truth and a lie are the same, but seen from another perspective. Once, like a young child accepting all. Now departing from its own structure. Denying everything, denying its existence. At the point of the final decay, like peace at the bottom of an empty heart, the search for our thoughts, emotions and desires is fulfilled. It is what we searched for in painting from the beginning. 

After each step, there is always one in front/behind. Riding the same vessel. At one point in the wounds of the decay of painting we would plant our seeds. But now it is time for painting to open up, leaving not only wounds to put our seeds in.

Between the words I refer to elements like Jesus and the void. They are meant as a metaphor. Not only to explain the piece but also to underpin it.

On the piece, a recuperation of images, corrosion has grown and taken its place. Forming a balance which tells a story about development. Once about a long gone society, now about the modern days. About modern art. Alike alloy, easy in maintenance but after a long time it will be weather-beaten. Corrosion forms on its body, giving a dynamic and organic structure. Never deforming its origin but intervening with its meaning.

crucifixion by fabien claude

crucifixion by fabien claude

Jesus and his crucifixion: a metaphor for painting itself.

The deformation of him (Jesus/painting), a building stone of our society. The vision of strength and distance. We used to differentiate ourselves from it. And not let ourselves become the personification of the work. Alike how we put other humans in pigeonholes. Again differentiating, not ready to use it as reflection.

He was the blank piece of paper, but given to us were words. Not all words, only those fitting on his body. These words were dominant and sadly not able to carry free speech. The dominance was equal to another time. A time long gone. In the time after new words have formed. The spaces left blank are easily filled. These new words carry more ‘freedom’, more strength. As they are not very different, the main difference is the will to be interpreted more widely. The combination of past and current times, mixing what once was and is. Like taking a look at the stars of a clear summer night: they are the visible proof of our history. You can see what once was, and still is visible.

The base of the construction. 

The cross proves no resistance to external forces. The image of a showpiece, on its shoulders a message without density, has passed. The construction proves that in its basis after all this time, it still is fertile for a new way of thinking. After all still connected to a strong fundamental basis. 

No clear image is visible, to fill in our void. Most of the uncreated part is ‘visible’, we create it. Finding our own thoughts in our own image development. What do we see in this traditional base and add. What did we find, and thus need to reflect on ourselves. Elements like suffering and education are still available in the piece, but it is the piece and us revealing it together.

crucifixion by fabien claude

crucifixion by fabien claude

The empty void on the canvas. 

Painting was poetic and demanded artistic attachment. It was the representation and reflection of current times, and what goes on. The result was a clear painting, for anyone. It was less or not self centered at all. Now, as specialization and individuality are words of our time, we feel the need to see work that is unfinished. Making it a piece of ourselves, mingling our thoughts with the piece. Finishing it.

The power of the current form of painting, depends on the force of its own destruction. It shall consume itself time after time, like a star consumes its own matter. Time after time providing enough energy for the next consummating of itself. Anything that is too heavy to be consummated, like in stars iron, makes this topic interesting. Where in stars iron takes more energy to consume, than it can produce. These heavy parts actually fill itself up with energy. Our image of the artform becomes too heavy. Like a star, it becomes a supernova for a short time. Interesting, but it has a short life. Because the artwork is uneasy to view as a total, smaller pieces are picked up. Going anywhere, exploding like the supernova. Sprouting itself into anything and anywhere. Who knows where it might be an influence. At this rhythm, we might see poetic and critical art on the same canvas.

‘Crucifixion’ is finished: viewing you. At both sides of the piece, the emptiness will not be filled. The reflection comes from the void. The piece itself hardly matters in its own ‘darkness’.

Painting still is a reflection on society, on us. Like a revolution; society changed and together we have put strength in the deformation/corrosion of painting. But at the same time we actually decipher art, we deform the corrosion. In our mind a clear painting forms, like once before. At a certain point we are able to appreciate the corrosion, perhaps like collecting a piece of the Berlin wall. The counterrevolution has already begun.

Text by Anthony Oliviero | S/TUDIO

 

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SOME/IMAGE : ROLAND & SABRINA MICHAUD

buddhist nuns on top of mont jiuhua, anhui province, china, 2002 photography by roland & sabrina michaud

afghan with a rose, 1968 photography by roland & sabrina michaud 

master of the nine mountains, calligraphing the name of the buddha, (south korea) 1973 photography by roland & sabrina michaud

indian girls training at kalarippayat, the famous martial art of kerala at cannanoi, kerala, india, 1994 photography by roland & sabrina michaud

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BEHIND THE SCENES : ANECHO EDITORIAL [PART I]

behind the scenes at anecho editorial photography by floriana castagna | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes at anecho editorial photography by floriana castagna | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes at anecho editorial photography by floriana castagna | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes at anecho editorial photography by floriana castagna | S/TUDIO

Behind-the-scenes of the editorial including Anecho ready-to-wear pieces created exclusively for S/T CONCEPT S/TORE by Haans Nicholas Mott & Anastasia Khodkina. Model Klara Puski & Derek Thomson photographed by Laure & Sarah www.laure-sarah.fr at Florian Tatsuhito's studio. Soon to be published on SOME/EDITORIAL.

About Anecho

Haans Nicholas Mott (of private label and shroud) is quietly launching the first iteration of a prêt-à-porter collaboration with Anastasia Khodkina entitled anecho(from anechoic chambers). Anecho is presenting a selection of pieces through SOME/THINGS private concept store in Paris. Although the pieces revealed in Paris will be exclusive fabrics to some/things, they will serve both as a first look at the anecho methods, materials, and sensibilities and a lead into the full capsule available in stores this coming autumn.

Haans Nicholas Mott is a wandering builder.
Anastasia Khodkina is a treasure hunter.

Photography by Floriana Castagna | S/TUDIO

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SOME/ART : DO DISTURB AT PALAIS DE TOKYO

A view on Do Disturb Festival at Palais de Tokyo

More than 60 events, performances, projections, installations in partnership with MoMA PS1 NYC, Tate Modern London, Berghain Berlin, Matadero Madrid, CNAP Paris and the 49 Nord 6 Est – Frac Lorraine.

Special thanks to the Head of Cultural Programming and Special Projects Vittoria Matarrese and the wonderful team at Palais de Tokyo.

Photography by James Cheng Tan, Nicklas Thrysøe, Eloise Gouby | S/TUDIO & Diane Khateeb

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SOME/ART : 'PROJECTION LA' INSTALLATION AT THE BATES MOTEL BY VINCENT LAMOUROUX

projection la installation at the bates motel by vincent lamouroux - photography by alice dison

projection la installation at the bates motel by vincent lamouroux - photography by alice dison

projection la installation at the bates motel by vincent lamouroux - photography by alice dison

projection la installation at the bates motel by vincent lamouroux - photography by alice dison

projection la installation at the bates motel by vincent lamouroux - photography by alice dison

projection la installation at the bates motel by vincent lamouroux - photography by alice dison

projection la installation at the bates motel by vincent lamouroux - photography by alice dison

French artist Vincent Lamouroux has transformed Siver Lake's deserted and derelict Sunset Pacific Motel into a temporary and ephemeral art installation.

Projection is produced by Please Do Not Enter and generously supported by Creative Migration, FLAX, Lycée international de Los Angeles and Institut Français. Sunset Pacific Motel provided by Frost/Chaddock.

"On Sunset Boulevard and Bates Avenue, a transitioning facade, an abandoned motel as a commonplace, archetype of the constant mobility of contemporary society. A white coat now adorns the architecture. The limewash thoroughly covers the building and the adjacent billboard, as well as the palm trees that surround it. The urban space is disrupted. An abandoned space is transfigured and enhanced, perhaps eluding its last glory. The motel's intriguing aspect is accommodating an imaginary drive away from our habitual quest for sameness.

Projection induces both an appearance and a disappearance; it revisits our existing landscape with new eyes and envisions the building’s surfaces as screens for the projection of our desires." - Vincent Lamouroux

Photography by Alice Dison

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SOME/DESIGN : Vincenzo de Cotiis - Progetto Domestico exhibition at L'Eclaireur Saint Ouen

progetto domestico by vincenzo de cotiis 

Trained at the Milan Poly­tech­nic, Vin­cenzo de Cotiis mar­ries the sense of space of an archi­tect with the sen­si­bil­ity to mate­ri­als of a plas­tic artist. He forges pure forms — either design objects, ambi­ences — by fol­low­ing an organic process which allows the final prod­uct to retain traces of the process. Touch is as impor­tant as sight, and gen­er­ates struc­tures and solutions.

Crys­talline, pure lines are charged with a new energy in the coun­ter­point of tex­tures and parts. Mate­ri­als – pre­cious, raw, some­times sal­vaged, always with intense evoca­tive power – char­ac­ter­ize every sin­gle project. Style results from the raw pre­ci­sion of the fin­ishes, from the unex­pected asso­ci­a­tions of parts, from a choice of faded colours that incor­po­rate the signs and scratches of time. De Cotiis esthetic is all about per­fect imperfection.

progetto domestico by vincenzo de cotiis 

progetto domestico by vincenzo de cotiis 

With Prog­etto Domes­tico, a series of limited-edition, non-duplicable fur­nish­ing pieces more akin to sculp­ture than design with a func­tional pur­pose, de Cotiis takes a step fur­ther into exper­i­men­tal design.

Prog­etto Domes­tico rein­ter­prets fur­nish­ings using mate­ri­als and sal­vaged parts that have been treated with exper­i­men­tal pro­ce­dures and tech­niques. This inter­pre­ta­tion goes beyond the lim­its of pure design and its obses­sion with lines, propos­ing a vision that is closer to con­tem­po­rary art than to design.

progetto domestico by vincenzo de cotiis 

progetto domestico by vincenzo de cotiis 

The unusual appear­ance of handtreated sur­faces with texture-effects on objects and mate­ri­als that char­ac­terise the pro­duc­tion of Prog­etto Domes­tico as recy­cled wood, fibre­glass, resin, leather, brass and iron, are true visual and tac­tile expe­ri­ences.  None of the Prog­etto Domestico’s shapes are sub­ject to the func­tion — they appear as poetic objects intended to the art of col­lect­ing and to the lim­ited edition.

Avail­able at L’Eclaireur Saint Ouen.

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SOME/FASHION : 'THE LAST CONSPIRACY' FACTORY IN PORTUGAL & INTERVIEW WITH DESIGNER ROALD NORE

photography by lisbeth breland saalmink

What is your background before starting to work with TLC? (Childhood, education, work etc.)

Well, I was born and raised in Jutland, Denmark - but as my mother is Norwegian, I also spent a lot of time with my family in Norway. Those trips meant simple living  - skiing, hiking and fishing and I guess that is where my love for the functional and understated comes from. Of course this also served as a foundation for my passion for items you can make with your bare hands. My education and early work experiences have all been of mercantile nature, but when I look back, I have always positioned myself in the direction of something that involved design - but back then it was mostly furniture and interior design. 

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

Why did you end up making shoes? Was it clear for you at an early point in your life?

My journey in the shoe-business started 15 years ago. In the beginning, this was as a retailer. In those years, my passion for quality and design, always guided me. I only bought very particular styles for my shop. So, when I got the chance to start to develop and produce myself, I immediately felt at home in the process. As a craftsman, I have always had very strong feelings about what I like – and don’t like. Therefore, after many years of learning about all the processes of making shoes, I felt that it was time to create from within. The result became a brand where I could use this wealth of knowledge and my uncompromising taste. That was when – and why - The Last Conspiracy was born.  

Where have you been living throughout your life and where have you been travelling?

My studio is still based in Denmark, but I spend around one third of my time in the atelier and factories in Portugal, and one third in the most important cities around the world for fairs and simply to gather inspiration. Travelling is an important part of creation. It settles the mind.

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

Where and how do you choose your different materials and which materials are you using?

For us, the leather selection is essential to crafting the right expression. The treatment and finishing can change the expression completely. We love exploring these processes. However, it is only possible to end up with the perfect texture and quality if you work closely together with your supplier. You have to really understand each other. The few suppliers we have, we have known for years, and when we bring new ideas, it is like going to the playground - we experiment until the texture is right. In this tactile and highly intuitive process, we always marvel when something new and interesting appears in the process. 

For the sturdier styles we use cow and horse leathers and we also have a few styles in camel, buffalo and kudu leather.  When to comes to the more feminine part of the collection, some subtle goat leather is used. If we choose to put a colour in the collection, we test it on the different leathers to see on which one it comes out best. It is important that the natural texture of the leather is still there, even if it has been given a hint of colour.  

Where do you produce the designs?

Everything is indeed produced in Portugal. We work with only a few factories - a team of unique craftsmen that we have been working with for more than a decade. These are people that we have developed a very close connection with. We respect each other’s skills and that means everything when crafting footwear. In many ways we operate as a close knit community. 

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

Do you often visit Scandinavia to keep up with the ideas and aesthetics for the designs? 

As mentioned, I still spend a great deal of my time at home in Scandinavia. This is where I find peace to gather my thoughts and inspirations. It is a perfect backdrop for solitude, ruggedness and clarity.

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

How would you describe TLC’s DNA as seen from outside?

When you combine clean lines with leathers of the best quality and skilled craftsmanship, you end up with a product where it is obvious that nothing is fake. The quality speaks for itself and nothing is hidden behind over styling. 
I guess you could say that we are, first of all, shoemakers, and with a love for aesthetics, and that is what we stand for. 

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

photography by  lisbeth breland saalmink

Are you thinking about sustainability within your way of producing the designs?

Even though we are not a totally eco-friendly company, we very much care about the environment. Most of our leathers are vegetable tanned and we are still exploring new, even gentler treatments. Leather is not wasted, as we cut to measure and produce to order. Our shoeboxes are made of 100% recycled cardboard and the print on the box we have kept to a minimum. In this manner we do embrace elements in crafting a more responsible way of creating, by contributing to sustainable innovation proactively.

Photography by Lisbeth Breland Saalmink & interview by  Nicklas Thrysøe | S/TUDIO

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SOME/EVENT : COLLABORATION LAUNCH EVENT AT CONCEPT S/TORE

Our latest collaborations were showcased on Thursday April 5th during Paris Fashion Week including the first ever ready-to-wear capsule collection called 'ANECHO' by Haans Nicholas Mott & Anastasia Khodkina, the cube vase made of iron with a polished surface 'A single flower vase for three flowers' by Kräfte - Japanese designer Yukio Kimura, the exquisite handmade jewellery 'ICELAND' collection in Murano glass by idonthaveasister - Alexandra Purcaru, the capsule collection of leather jackets & pants by the Italian label 10sei0otto, the buffalo horn sunglass 'S/T Pagoda' by Rigards, the strong 'Krypton' jewellery collection made from steel, chrome, gold & silver by Rock The Rocks - Ronan Masson & Vittoria Mattarese, the incredible molded leather bags 'Mytilus' by Khourianbeer, the refined black, gold & silver 'S/T Rehab 40' watches by Fob Paris and the second addition of Alicia Hannah Naomi's creation, a silver & sapphire pendant with a leather necklace 'Idris'. 

 

Photography by S/TEAM

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