Comment

SOME/ART : 'Samsa G. Tuchwaren' [PART I]

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

Located in the western outskirts of Munich, Hamid Bagherzadeh and Liu Zheng have reticently transformed part of a former factory complex into an exceptional gallery space, named Samsa G. Tuchwaren, inspired by Kafka’s „The Metamorphosis“. While the interior has mostly been left in its distinctive shape of the industrial early 20th century, the facility yet contains a powerful, contemporary 

quality which adds to its timeless and brutal aesthetic. Masterly blended into this uncompromising environment, Samsa G. Tuchwaren revealed itself to a public audience with their inaugural exhibition „Process! Episode One: Ambrotypes“, a collaboration between STEFAN MILEV (Stuttgart), STEFAN SAPPERT (Wien) and NINI GOLLONG (Paris). 

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

Spanning a total number of 7 ambrotype photographs, „Process!“ is the incarnate witness to an extensive and consistent examination of 7 carefully selected garments by Carol Christian Poell. Arranged and staged by set designer Nini Gollong in a dramatic interplay of shadows and lights, the objects have been caught with pho- tochemical expertise by photographers Stefan Milev & Stefan Sappert. After catching an overall glimpse of the exhibition the visitor gets the chance to step into an original 1920’s decompression chamber to watch a short documentary about the process, visually informing about each ambrotype production step. The unconventional and one-of-a-kind format of 800 x 600 mm has been realized by the use of a custom built large format camera. Specifically blackened glass increases the depth and contrasts of each warm-toned unique specimen as ambrotypes 

unlike common film processes are non-reproducible. As a refinement, the ambrotypes have been finished with lavender oil to add a characteristic surface texture. Due to the process, each one of the 7 finished art objects slightly differs in their outcome which is considered to do justice to their singularity and adapts to the ethos of Poell’s work. In order to encase the visitor atmospherically, the exhibition is accompanied  by a light installation by Ralf Arndt as well as soundscapes by Sebastian Galante, one for each individual am- brotype. In addition, the camera’s cartridge has been sunk into a block of black rubber by Carol Christian Poell himself as a contribution to the gallery and is displayed along with the custom camera used in the process. 

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

photography by philipp altheimer | S/TUDIO

http://www.samsa-g-tuchwaren.com 
http://www.carolchristianpoell.com/

Photography & Text by Philipp Altheimer | S/TUDIO

Comment

Comment

SOME/IMAGE : 'MINES' BY EDWARD BURTYNSKY

Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007

The act of representing landscape isn't a new phenomenon, it's rather an old practice that extends back millennia to ancient cultures. This can be perceived as an activity for reasons of identification, story telling and remembrance. However, what is contemporary is the capturing of the land in an unnatural perpetual motion as a result of humans, advanced technology and machines. A relentless process of extraction for natural resources. Edward Burtynsky photograph series 'Mines', renders exactly this modern development on a large scale. Imagery that holds an inherent paradox of demolition and production, and progression and transgression. 

Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, 2007

Upon viewing and digesting the “Mines” images, there arises some unequivocal similarities and comparisons to be made with Aboriginal art. The drawing of the two together, provides compelling insight and a new dynamic to Burtynsky's work. Of course the visual vernacular and context is diverse between the two, as well as the mediums. One a traditional painting method and the other modern digital photography. However it is what they seek to and how they portray the same subject which brings their art into an extraordinary parallel. Namely, the subject matter of 'country' and specifically the Australian landscape.  The correlations reach from formal qualities through to concern and content. The aerial view and colours of Burtynsky's photographs recalls the flatness of Aboriginal dot paintings and their use of the Australian landscape colour palette. 

Burtynsky's series of photographs taken in 2007 of the Australian landscape, portray colossal mines that are located in the North-West of the country. These constructions lay outside of the vicinity of urban life and in a harsh and temperamental environment. The aerial photographs are seeped in these rich, earthy colours of ochres, oranges, umbers, oxides and chalky whites. Amongst the natural landscapes are signs of technology and mining activity, from the gaping holes and terracing, to the dispersion of roads like a river delta. The photographs act as a kind of topographical chart of the land, but if only ephemerally as they render a vision of an unnatural transformation.   

Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007

Both place the viewer in the perspective of peering down from above. This evokes the quality of the unintelligible scale of the land, with neither all encapsulating. Such as in 'Silver Lake Operations 5#', showing only a slice of the mine, a single mine opening surrounded by roads that converge and disperse connecting to other areas. The aerial view evades great detail but rather encompasses and emphasizes scale, a reoccurring quality throughout Burtynsky's work. The vibrancy of earthy tones echoes the pigments used in Aboriginal dot paintings, such as the whites, reds, oranges that flourish in the Australian landscape. The qualities within the photograph combine to produce visually astounding sites, which are also shadowed by an essence of poignance. This evocation can be seen from the destruction of the terrain, especially when compared to the representation of country in Aboriginal art.  

Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007

Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007

Furthermore, both communicate a story and a period of history to produce a type of documentary image. While, Aboriginal painting hones in dreamtime and ancestral stories from long ago, Burtynsky depicts what is the contemporary evolution of man. Aboriginal paintings also a depict sacred land sites, in a sense this becomes apparent too in Burtynsky's work. This can be seen in so far as considering why humanity does mine and the importance that is placed upon it and its production. It is undoubting to associate these colossal sites within a contemporary context, as core construction for what we can call modern life. No one can doubt that life as we know would not be how it is without a such thing. Their stature as a capitalist economic commodity grant them a prestigious position, a stimulant for humanities survival and progress. Of course this comes at a 

Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007

price, as Burtynsky imagery shows the destruction of land and reciprocates our greed and appetite to extract from the earth. The sanctity of unaffected nature is no longer of value. Burtynsky depicts the touched by man while Aboriginal paintings depict the untouched environment. Aboriginal art communicates their platonic and spiritual connection and harmony to 'country', granting it's unaffected character as most important. To consider the comparisons between Aboriginal painting and Burtynsky photographs, seeks to enrich the understanding of the latter and the photographer's unmistakable theme. Burtynsky reveals our own vices, particularly our insatiable desire to extract from the land and without considering what the future consequences will be.

Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007

Image courtesy of Edward Burtynsky

Text by Hannah Nesbitt | S/TUDIO

Comment

Comment

SOME/EVENT : CHRISTIAN DADA AFTERPARTY AT SILENCIO DURING PARIS MEN'S FASHION WEEK FALL/WINTER 2015

Christian Dada Men's Fall/Winter 2015 Afterparty at Silencio featuring Zebra Katz performance and DJ set by Mademoiselle Yulia

Photography by Yulia Shadrinsky | Special thanks to Bureau Haiati, Mumi Haiati & Marc Göhring

Comment

Comment

BEHIND THE SCENES : GARLAND COO EDITORIAL

behind the scenes at garland coo editorial photography by eloise gouby | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes at garland coo editorial photography by eloise gouby | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes at garland coo editorial photography by eloise gouby | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes at garland coo editorial photography by eloise gouby | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes at garland coo editorial photography by eloise gouby | S/TUDIO

Behind-the-scenes at the editorial including Garland Coo garments from fall/winter 2015 collection, photographed by Ruggiero Cafagna, at 'Les Espaces d'Abraxas' building complex (Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura 1982), featuring Cyril Trehoux/Tomorrow Is Another Day soon to be published on SOME/EDITORIAL.

Special thanks to Jasmin Isabel Eckerle, Johann Schröder & Dilan Cicek.
Photography by Eloise Gouby | S/TUDIO

Comment

Comment

SOME/IMAGE : 'QUARRIES' BY EDWARD BURTYNSKY

Rock of Ages #4 Abandoned Section, Adam-Pirie Quarry, Barre, Vermont, USA, 1991

Edward Burtynsky's series “Quarries” are photographs of different quarries from all the over the world. They are photographed from afar and up close and capture the presence of humans and technology in a juxtaposition to the natural landscape. 

The depiction of technology and humanity within the images is dwarfed by the overwhelming grandeur of the Quarries. The man manipulated rocks are monumental in size and recall the ancient Pyramids in Egypt or the Mayan temples in South America. The geometric formations, that have been cut 

Rock of Ages #39 Active Section, E.L. Smith Quarry, Barre, Vermont, USA, 1991

away at over the years appear as enormous sculptures or parts of the organic architecture.  Here, our bodies are dwarfed by the unyielding scale, the space relentlessly dictates our body and how we respond to it. “Rock of Ages #15” captures light and dark grey rocks with a rich patina that protrude vertically into large rectangular prisms. This inherently contrasts with the human presence within the image such the as tools and machines. The landscape doesn't fit in the frame and rather extends beyond in a limitless capacity. This entrenches the polylithic landscape as something immeasurable and as a commander of our being. 

Rock of Ages #15 Active Section, E.L. Smith Quarry, Barre, Vermont, USA, 1992

Rock of Ages #25 Abandoned Section, Adam-Pirie Quarry, Barre, Vermont, USA, 1991

Furthermore, absence rather than presence within the images ostensibly appears of great importance. The Quarries suggest what once was; a mountain that had long been standing for thousands of years which has now been transformed through rigorous carving. The rocks reveal their own process of creation, they are a product of subtraction rather than addition. Human technology that is actively used for elimination and removal is filtrated throughout the images communicating a vague, distance narrative of the Quarries. Burtynsky suggests this with 

China Quarries #3 Xiamen, Fujian Province, China, 2004

Iberia Quarries #3 Cochicho Co., Pardais, Portugal, 2006

Rock of Ages #7 Active Section, E.L. Smith Quarry, Barre, Vermont, USA, 1991

Carrara Marble Quarries #3 Carrara, Italy, 1993

the photograph 'Carrara Marble Quarries #3'. The image exposes parts of the mountain that has not been touched by the hands of man and which remains in its natural state with even plants caressing the rock. This unscathed part of the mountain lays in direct contrast to the centre which has been carved away by the Quarry workers and their technology to create these empty and inverted areas. This negative space serves as a reminder for what now is not apparent, to ultimately conjure up an uncanny link to the past.

Makrana Marble Quarries #13 Rajasthan, India, 2000

Iberia Quarries #9 Cochicho Co., Pardais, Portugal, 2006

Image courtesy of Edward Burtynsky

Text by Hannah Nesbitt | S/TUDIO

Comment

1 Comment

BEHIND THE SCENES : ASTON MARTIN x GL-OW x S/T AM/008 PROJECT

behind the scenes aston martin gl-ow S/T am/008 project photography by james cheng tan | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes aston martin gl-ow S/T am/008 project photography by james cheng tan | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes aston martin gl-ow S/T am/008 project photography by james cheng tan | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes aston martin gl-ow S/T am/008 project photography by james cheng tan | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes aston martin gl-ow S/T am/008 project photography by james cheng tan | S/TUDIO

behind the scenes aston martin gl-ow S/T am/008 project photography by james cheng tan | S/TUDIO

Project to be published in the upcoming S/T MAGAZINE 008

Photography by James Cheng TANS/TUDIO

1 Comment

Comment

SOME/FASHION : ADICIANNOVEVENTITRE / A1923 FALL/WINTER 2015-2016 [PART II]

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

photography by pouria khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

Installation by artist Gianni Politi
Special thanks to Simone Cecchetto , Christina Lynch Gianni Politi 
Photography by Pouria Khojastehpay S/TUDIO

Comment

Comment

SOME/ART : KATSUHIRO OTOMO

AKIRA Paperback Collection Volume 5. First printing : December 11, 1990. by Katsuhiro Otomo

Otomo Katsuhiro (April 14, 1954) is a Japanese manga artist, screenwriter and film director. He is best known as the creator of the Japanese manga series and undisputed masterwork Akira and its animated film adaptation. Otomo was the winner of the 2016 Angoulême Grand Prix on January 29th, 2015, the first manga artist honored. Akira is a 1980s cyberpunk epic told across six volumes. It's a story of super-sciencepolitics and youth in

revolt set in a post-apocalyptic version of Neo-Tokyo. The story focuses on Kaneda and Tetsuo, two bōsōzoku gang members known as the Capsules and led by Kaneda. Until Tetsuo is cursed with uncontrollable powers and develops powerful psychic abilities which manifest as expressions of his crippling self-loathing and jealously.

Title page of AKIRA episode 069 by Katsuhiro Otomo

AKIRA Neo-Tokyo by Katsuhiro Otomo

AKIRA Neo-Tokyo by Katsuhiro Otomo

AKIRA Neo-Tokyo by Katsuhiro Otomo

Otomo’s drawings of Neo-Tokyo’s dystopian architecture is mostly based on Brutalism, a architectural movement descended from modernist architecture of the early 20th century. It created an image that communicated strength and used concrete for its raw and unpretentious honesty and with these elements it completed the atmosphere of the environment. Otomo explores nihilism, corruption and violence in Akira. The series tells the narrative of a conflicted, corrupt and desperate city borne out of a fictional catastrophic event. This recalls the real-life bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the Japanese people’s struggle to redefine their nation in the post-war era. 

Similar to his work Akira and before he became internationally famous, he also created the series named Domu : A Child’s Dream. The story is about an old man and a child possessing extrasensory powers. The main theme that crosses Domu is the child’s mind. Where the little girl named Etsuko is too mature for her age. The main inspiration that led to the creation of Domu is the first apartment complex Otomo lived in when he moved to Tokyo and partly a news report about a rash of suicides in a different apartment complex.

Domu: A Child's Dream by Katsuhiro Otomo

Domu: A Child's Dream by Katsuhiro Otomo

Image courtesy of Katsuhiro Otomo, Young Magazine and Kodansha 1982-1990
Text by Pouria Khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

Comment