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SOME/FASHION : BARBARA I GONGINI SPRING/SUMMER 2015

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

barbara í gongini spring/summer 2015 photography by malou bumbum  | S/TUDIO

Barbara I Gongini (BIG) showcased her SS15 collection in the darkened foyer of Copenhagen City Hall during Copenhagen Fashion Week in August, where she was set to open the fashion week because of her sharp focus on sustainability.

The choice of materials used included lamb leather, synthetic silk, woven cotton, chalk coated linen and horse leather among others, and the colours used were mainly black with white and grey tones in between.

Some of the models were impressively styled wearing nests of combined threads as hair, leather objects and dark make-up. Some of the models even had nails and fingers which were covered in silver.

BIG sent some of the models out in pairs tied together or hand in hand and when reaching approximately the middle of the catwalk they did a small performance, like marionettes without strings. During the small performances you got to have a closer look at all the asymmetrical details and the flexibility in the designs.

Besides opening Copenhagen Fashion Week, BIG was also a part of the “New Nordic” exhibition, which showcased whole completed sustainable designs in Nikolaj Kunsthal.

Photography by Malou Bumbum & Text by Nicklas Thrysoe | S/TUDIO

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SOME/WHERE : ABSENCE / PRESENCE TADAO ANDO'S MEDITATION SPACE

tadao ando's meditation space by pouria kohjastehpay | S/TUDIO

tadao ando's meditation space by pouria kohjastehpay | S/TUDIO

tadao ando's meditation space by pouria kohjastehpay | S/TUDIO

tadao ando's meditation space by pouria kohjastehpay | S/TUDIO

tadao ando's meditation space by pouria kohjastehpay | S/TUDIO

tadao ando's meditation space by pouria kohjastehpay | S/TUDIO

Life is not a thing, a philosophical entity: it is an attitude of mind towards what is being observed.” — N.W. Pine

The meditation space was designed by Japanese architect Tadao Ando, to UNESCO headquarters in Paris in 1995. It chose a site next to the Japanese garden designed by Isamu Noguchi in 1958, to create the space for prayer. This is an abstract space that suggests loneliness and spiritual freedom. Nature has a key role in this work. Ando used architecture as a mediator between the natural environment and man, and find the direct meeting between them. Light, water and air are essential to the idea of Ando, evoking the natural world.

The Ensō (circle) is a sacred symbol in the Zen school of Buddhism and is one of the most common subjects of Japanese calligraphy and it has influenced Ando’s work and vocabulary of architecture. The circle drawn by Zen-Budhists symbolizes emptiness, oneness and the moment of enlightenment. Ando sees the most important thing is to integrate physical architecture with eternal nature, so that people can perceive nature in their process of dwelling, such as the motions of the sun, the moon, the earth and meteorological changes. The body of his work is known for the creative use of natural light and for structures that follow natural forms of the landscape, rather than disturbing the landscape by making it conform to the constructed space of a building. The religious term Zen, focuses on the concept of simplicity and concentrates on inner feeling rather than outward appearance. Zen influences vividly show in Ando’s work and became its distinguishing mark.

The Meditation Space was constructed with concrete, providing a sense of cleanliness and weightlessness at the same time. Due to the simplicity of the exterior, construction and organization of the space are relatively potential in order to represent the aesthetic of sensation.

Photography by Pouria Khojastehpay | S/TUDIO

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SOME/WHERE : 'INTRAMUROS, SHAPES OF PALERME' ITALY

cathédrale santa vergine maria assunta de palerme photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

cathédrale santa vergine maria assunta de palerme photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

cathédrale santa vergine maria assunta de palerme photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

cathédrale santa vergine maria assunta de palerme photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

cathédrale santa vergine maria assunta de palerme photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

cathédrale santa vergine maria assunta de palerme photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

église santa maria dello spasimo photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

église santa maria dello spasimo photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

palais alliata di pietratagliata photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

palais alliata di pietratagliata photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

corso vittorio emanuele photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

corso vittorio emanuele photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

église santa maria dello spasimo photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

église santa maria dello spasimo photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

palazzina cinese photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

palazzina cinese photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

nautoscopio installation par giuseppe amato photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

nautoscopio installation par giuseppe amato photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

palais alliata di pietratagliata photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

palais alliata di pietratagliata photography by floriana castagna  | S/TUDIO

Photography by  Floriana Castagna S/TUDIO

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SOME/ART : NONOTAK DAYDREAM V.2

daydream v.2 by nonotak studio

daydream v.2 by nonotak studio

daydream v.2 by nonotak studio

daydream v.2 by nonotak studio

daydream v.2 by nonotak studio

daydream v.2 by nonotak studio

4,5m x 4,5m x 2,5m, Audiovisual installation by Noemi Schipfer & Takami Nakamoto, 2013.

DAYDREAM is an audiovisual installation that generates space distortions. Relationship between space and time, accelerations, contractions, shifts and metamorphosis have been the lexical field of the project. This installation aimed at establishing a physical connection between the virtual space and the real space, blurring the limits and submerging the audience into a short detachment from reality. Lights generate abstract spaces while sounds define the echoes of virtual spaces. Daydream is an invitation to contemplation. The frontality of the installation leads the visitors to a passive position.

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SOME/FASHION : KUBORAUM BERLIN

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

kuboraum flagshipstore, studio & showroom in berlin photography by nicklas thrysøe  | S/TUDIO

Kuboraum are masks designed on the face of those who wear them, masks that highlight personality and emphasize character. The mask is synonymous with protection and shelter. They are like cubic rooms where we shelter ourselves, where we are free to live in our intimacy, where we live all our identities and look at the world through two lenses.

Kuboraum was founded in Berlin in the rooms of a past present studio and gallery. A former post office on the border between east and west Berlin. The space was originally converted into a gallery, but after various metamorphoses, today this place includes the studio, showroom and the flagship store.

All masks are entirely dreamed in Berlin and handmade in Italy. They are not an inanimate and inorganic object, but obtains the power of a mask.

Kuboraum has no logo. It is a mask with it’s own look and power, but as soon as you wear it, the mask highlights the personality and features of the person wearing it, Kuboraum’s identity is about this relationship.

Kuboraum's flagship store, studio and showroom are located at köpenicker strasse 96 in Berlin.

Photography and text by Nicklas Thrysøe | S/TUDIO

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SOME/WHERE : 'I WOULD LIKE TO DIE ON MARS'

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

courtesy nasa / jpl / university of arizona

HiRISE
Launched in August of 2005, the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) is one of the six science instruments that is flying onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission. It has photographed hundreds of targeted swaths of Mars' surface in
unprecedented detail.
HiRISE is investigating deposits and landforms resulting from geologic and climatic processes and assist in the evaluation of candidate landing sites.
The camera operates in visible wavelengths, the same as human eyes, but with a telescopic lens that produces images at resolutions never before seen in planetary exploration missions. These high-resolution images enable scientists to distinguish 1-meter-size (about 3-foot-size) objects on Mars and to study the morphology (surface structure) in a much more comprehensive
manner than ever before.
HiRISE also makes observations at near-infrared wavelengths to obtain information on the mineral groups present. From an altitude that varies from 200 to 400 kilometers (about 125 to 250 miles) above Mars, HiRISE acquires surface images containing individual, basketball-size (30 to 60 centimeters, or 1 to 2 feet wide) pixel elements, allowing surface features 4 to 8 feet across to be resolved. These new, high-resolution images are providing unprecedented
views of layered materials
, gullies, channels, and other science targets, in addition to characterizing possible future landing sites.
The Principal Investigator (lead scientist) for HiRISE is Alfred McEwen from the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona.

Credit: HiRISE Operations Center, University of Arizona NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

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SOME/WHERE : WITH INSOMNIA NOTHING IS REAL | ROMANIA

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

with insomnia nothing is real romania by sophie loloi | S/TUDIO

Photography by Sophie Loloi | S/TUDIO

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SOME/FILM : EAT YOUR BONES | MANGE TES MORTS

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

Eat your Bones by Jean-Charles Hue

I declared in a previous article (Mathieu Pernot – The Passage), Eat Your Bones by Jean-Charles Hue would be one of the cinematic phenomena of the year.

The film has just made its presence felt on the independant french cinema scene by receiving the distinguished award, the « Prix Jean Vigo ». For those who would ignore the impact of this single award, it is each year given to a french director for his or her independent-minded-ness and unique direction. It is a kind of symbol of the artistic freedom, which tends to be a value relatively scarce at the core of our national productions – hence should be acknowledged.

Eat Your Bones is above all the story of an ordinary guy – who wanted to become a filmmaker. A « gadjo » who was not an obvious candidate to take on this role but posesses all qualities needed to become a visionary Genius. Jean-Charles Hue is one of these (rare) young directors that makes wait for the next film with gleeful impatience. The one about the playful child who embarks on a fantastic ride or the one about the fan of westerns who is about to discover Ennio Morricones' latest creation. You know that it will fill you with such pleasure and you also know you will be touched at your most profound sensibilities. An emotional rollercoaster, from pleasure to fear to release, a real sensitivity to feelings is what you are about to experience.

The parisian retake of La Quinzaine des Réalisateurs at Forum des Images this is an event not to be missed. Jean-Charles Hue was present himself to introduce the imminent screening. Standing upright with assistance, this macadam cowboy spoke about his film with simple words. Without any frills, he paid a special tribute to those of the Yenishe community who had « adopted » him. He effortlessly evoked an obvious sympathy that made us champion his cause–– his sincerity and humility becoming suitable ideas.

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

The Engine of the « Gadjo »

Jean-Charles Hue met his public in 2010 when he signed on to a docu-fiction that was favored by the critics but parched the mouths of cinema professionals : « The Lord’s Ride ». He introduced us to the Dorkel family and showed us the travel community from another point of view.

Between the worry and esteem of loved ones, the need to vandalize in order to survive, and the wave of Christian morals generated by the elderly – it is mostly a voyage into the guts of a community that still lives with, and stands by, the principle of respect. This value – that might seem to be outdated and diminishing in the hearts of our societies -  seems to be justified in our eyes full of sins.

The process is not the one of a journalist, who holds his breath and dives into an unknown universe – but the one of an insider who pays a emotional tribute to his foster home. Even if he was not himself born into the community, he became an inherent part of them. With ancestral ties with the Dorkels, he posesses a fair gift to listen and adapt, human skills that reveal a humility. We get the Dorkels position : facing such a guy– cut out of rock and ready to sacrifice all for the salvation of his beloved – how could they turn him away?

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

EYB – The 2 Overlapping Morals

Eat your Bones starts at the moment when Fred Dorkel, the impulsive backpacker and older brother, is released from jail and returns to his family. When Fred got caught, Jason the protagonist, was only a child. The years go by, that saw the early passing of his father, had made Jason grow up dreaming about the stories of his big bro’ – who he ended up to admire and worship more than anything – without ever really knowing him. But Jason also develops a sound and stable relationship with his cousin, an asserted evangelist, who pushes him to be baptised.

After a sentences of 10 years, Fred is released and this newly freed man acts as if time had stopped after he went into prison– not realizing the past and the time he reigned as king were now gone. The film principally takes place over a one-night evil roadtrip in the BMW that had cost Fred's freedom a decade earlier. In the car are: the three Dorkel Brothers (Fred, Jason, and the middle Brother Mickael, a violent coward), and their cousin that turned away from sin. The objective: to steal a truckload of copper that will allow Fred to feed his family during the time it will take to restablish his reputation in the free world. 

Thus it is not surprising that the title for this wild ride is Eat Your Bones (the supreme insult in the Yenish community). As the night cries violently while running away from them, Jason realizes that in fact he does not come from his brother’s past and is not ready to go down that particular road.

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

The Travelling Oracles

Between evangelization and life of a thug, the central character of Jason, on the brink of adulthood– faces a dilemma. Whatever life he choses, he will have to deny his origins in one way or another. And the public finds itself the witness to the dichotomy that is embedded in the Yenish community: following the path of sin or converting to conform? Soon enough, you understand that this religious call is a common issue – and when digging into the matter,  you learn that more and more members of the community chose to dedicate themselves to Jesus.

What is particularly striking about the arguments of the chosers of this path, is to hear that the choice to follow Jesus is mainly a means of changing the community’s image, to stop their children from being put behind bars and also in hopes to be relieved from suffering their own scarlet letter.

As a new founding base that cements the intergenerational bonds, the religious manifestations shown sometimes seem to flirt with a suspicious proselytism – but relatively benign. Popular songs written to unite the worshippers, tents raised as small temples in the middle wastelands, recurring baptisms in plastic inflatable pools, spastic trances. The extravaganza is sometimes troubling but the homage and the words are poignant.

However you react to this – the intent deserves to be ackowledged and the first fable offered by Jean-Charles Hue never is belittling or apologetic. His narration attempts to address a transgenre film – between polar and modern in a Western sense – of a wise parabola and a terrible altruism. The territory is marked by mirroring the foundations of a community which has relation to their land that defies the boundaries of universality. To understand that their attachment to their origins and traditions overcomes the values of worldwide nationalities often clumsily marked.

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

Mange tes Morts de Jean-Charles Hue

Je l'annonçais dans un précédent article (Mathieu Pernot - La Traversée), Mange tes Morts de Jean-Charles Hue serait l'un des phénomènes cinématographiques de l'année.

Le film vient de se distinguer sur la scène indépendante française en recevant l'illustre Prix Jean Vigo. Pour ceux qui ignorerait l'impact singulier de cette récompense, elle est chaque année attribuée à un réalisateur français pour l’indépendance de son esprit et l’originalité de sa réalisation. C’est en quelque sorte le symbole d’une liberté artistique qui se fait bien rare au cœur de nos productions nationales - et que l’on ne peut que saluer bien bas.

Mange tes Morts c’est surtout l'histoire d'un mec - qui voulait devenir cinéaste. Un gadjo que rien ne prédestinait sur le papier mais qui réunit toutes les qualités pour s’imposer comme un génie visionnaire. Jean-Charles Hue est l’un de ces (rares) jeunes réalisateurs dont on attend le prochain film avec une impatience enjouée. Celle de l’enfant qui trépigne face à une chevauchée fantastique, celle du fan de western qui s’apprête à écouter la dernière création d’Ennio Morricone. On sait que l’on va y prendre un plaisir jouissif et l’on se prépare également à être touchés au plus profond de nos sensibilités. Un rollercoaster émotionnel - du plaisir à la peur jusqu’à l’émotion - c’est ce qui vous attend, en vous lançant à la conquête de cette œuvre là.

La reprise parisienne de la Quinzaine des Réalisateurs au Forum des Images s’inscrit donc comme un événement à ne pas manquer. Jean-Charles Hue est présent pour une introduction à l’expérience imminente. Debout face à l’assistance, ce macadam cowboy parle de son œuvre en des termes simples. Il adresse un hommage sans fioritures à ceux de la communauté Yeniche qui l’ont « adopté ». Déjà, sans grand effort, une évidente sympathie nous fait souscrire à sa cause – sa sincérité et son humilité en justes lignes d’affect.

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

Le Moteur du Gadjo

La rencontre de Jean-Charles Hue avec son public débute en 2010, alors qu’il signe un docu-fiction qui fit couler de l’encre et tarit la salive des cinéphiles et professionnels du métier : La BM du Seigneur. On y fait connaissance avec la famille Dorkel et l’on découvre enfin sous un nouvel angle la communauté des gens du voyage.

Entre crainte et estime des proches, nécessité du vandalisme pour survivre et vague de christianisation engendrée par les aînés – c’est surtout un voyage dans les entrailles d’une communauté qui vit encore pour et par Le Respect. Cette valeur - qui peut paraître désuète et qui va s’étiolant au cœur de nos sociétés – jouit encore ici d’une superbe qui justifierait à nos yeux bien des pêchés.

L'exercice n'est pas celui d'un journaliste d'investigation qui plonge en apnée dans un univers jusqu'alors inconnu de lui - mais celui d'un insider qui rend un hommage bouleversant à sa famille d'adoption. Parce que si lui-même n’est pas né au cœur de cette communauté, il en fait intrinsèquement partie désormais. Des racines ancestrales le liant à la famille Dorkel, une belle capacité d’écoute et d’adaptation, un pouvoir d’humanité qui transpire de l’humilité qu’il affiche posément. On les comprend vite, les Dorkel : s’entourer d’un gars comme lui - un mec comme on en fait plus, taillé dans le roc et prêt à tous les sacrifices pour le salut des siens – cela ne se refuse pas !

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

MTM - La Chevauchée des Deux Morales

Mange tes Morts débute au moment où Fred Dorkel, frère aîné baroudeur et impulsif, sort de prison et retrouve les siens. Lorsque Fred s’est fait incarcérer, Jason le protagoniste central de notre affaire, n’était qu’un enfant. Pendant toutes ces années, en l’absence d’un père décédé trop tôt, Jason a grandi au rythme des récits d’aventures de son grand frère, qu’il admire et qu’il aime plus que tout – sans le connaître pourtant.  Mais il a aussi tissé une complicité plus saine et rangée avec son cousin, évangéliste affirmé, qui le pousse à se faire baptiser.

A sa sortie, Fred a dix ans de décalage– et agit comme si tout son monde s’était arrêté dans un passé désormais révolu. Le film se déroule principalement sur un road trip infernal d’une nuit réunissant - dans la BM « chouravée » qui avait valu la liberté de Fred une décennie auparavant -  les trois frères Dorkel (Fred, Jason, leur dernier frère Mickael, lâche et violent) et leur cousin qui a choisi de s’éloigner du pêché. Leur objectif : une cargaison de cuivre qui permettra à Fred de nourrir sa famille le temps de se refaire une réputation dans le monde libre.

Ce n’est donc pas une surprise si cette chevauchée sauvage est intitulée Mange tes morts (insulte suprême des gitans). Comme un cri violent dans une nuit qui leur échappe et qui permet à Jason de réaliser que, dans les faits, il n’est pas initié au passé de son frère et surtout pas prêt à se lancer dans cette direction là.

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

still image from eat your bones all rights reserved

Les Oracles Voyageurs

Entre évangélisation et vie de « chouraveur », le personnage central de Jason, nouveau majeur – fait face à un dilemme. Car quelle que soit la voie qu’il choisira, il devra en partie renier ses origines. Et le public se trouve pris à témoin de cette dichotomie propre à la communauté Yéniche : suivre la voix du pêché ou se faire baptiser pour tenter de rentrer dans le droit chemin ? On comprend vite que cet appel vers la religion est une préoccupation quotidienne – et en s’y penchant on découvre que la communauté évangélique y est  de plus en plus développée.

Ce qui frappe particulièrement dans les arguments avancés par les intéressés, c’est d’entendre que choisir Jésus est surtout un moyen de pacifier l’image de la communauté, de ne plus envoyer ses enfants pour de longs séjours derrière les barreaux mais aussi d’espérer ne plus subir l’opprobre des citoyens sédentaires.

Comme un nouveau socle fondateur cimentant les liens intergénérationnels, les manifestations religieuses auxquelles on assiste nous paraissent parfois flirter avec un prosélytisme douteux – mais relativement bénin. Chansons populaires écrites pour fédérer les fidèles, tente dressée spécialement comme un petit temple au centre des terrains vagues, baptêmes réguliers dans des piscines gonflables en plastique, transes spasmodiques. Le spectacle est éloquent – parfois gênant – mais l’hommage et le vocabulaire employé sont poignants.

Quoiqu’on décide d’en penser – le geste mérite d’être salué et la fable initiatique offerte par Jean-Charles Hue n’est jamais dénigrante ou apologique. Sa narration s’en tient à dresser un film transgenre – entre polar et western moderne – d’une parabole censée et terriblement altruiste. S’y reflète l’ancrage terrien d’une communauté dont le rapport au terrain défie les limites de l’universalité, dont l’attachement aux origines et traditions dépasse les valeurs d’une citoyenneté mondiale souvent mal revendiquée.

Sélection Quinzaine des Réalisateurs Cannes 2014

Prix Jean Vigo

Casting Frédéric Dorkel, Jason François, Mickaël Dauber, Moïse Dorkel, Joseph Dorkel

Copyright Reserved Rights Capricci Films

Texts by Charlotte Robert | S/TUDIO

English translation : Charlotte Robert & Maria Mocerino

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